The way of questioning

I wrote this a couple of years ago; unfortunately for us, the arguments here are even more valid now than they were when I wrote these words. 

Fundamentalism is one of those modern predicaments that often come clothed in ancient garb. Religious fundamentalists like to tout their faithfulness to a pure version of their tradition. In practice, fundamentalism is more about exclusion rather than purity; co-religionists are often targeted for their impure faith - perhaps they sing and dance or celebrate a festival that they shouldn't. As for those who are outside the circle, they are fair game. There's no room for doubt or accommodation; certainty is the hallmark of the fundamentalist. When seen this way, there's no shortage of scientific fundamentalists either. People like Richard Dawkins are as vehement in their atheism as any Taliban preacher. 

It's easy to see that certainty is incompatible with humility; without humility, there's no going forward. Let me be clear, I am not talking about humility as an emotion - some of the most fundamentalist people I know are humble in their external attitude and fanatics in their faith. Humility is an orientation that recognizes one's humanity and the incompleteness of one's knowledge. That's the attitude of the seeker, who is full of doubt, even if she comes to that doubt with great faith. If certainty is the standard of the fundamentalist, doubt is the engine of the seeker. 

I like doubt because certainty is boring. Humility is not just a negative attribute, i.e., the lack of arrogance or omniscience; it is also a positive energy that propels one forward to ask new questions. Let's put it another way: there are two ways of being: the answer way and the question way. The answer way wants certainty, though it will settle for closure when it can't get certainty. Consider science, both as it is taught and how it advances: it does so by stacking one answer on top of another. Papers get published because they settled a doubt or verified a hypothesis. There's no journal of questions. Engineers are more modest. There are no final answers, but products have to ship and customers have to be served and until then there's a temporary freeze on development. That's what I mean by the term closure, you close off all options until further notice. 

The question way has much less prestige. There are no patents for questions. There are no named professorships at Harvard for questions. In fact, it is often dangerous, as children learn quickly after asking awkward questions at home or school. On the other hand, a good question is like an arrow pointed at the uncovered belly of the dragon; it can bring the whole edifice down and usher a revolution in thought. To the questioner, an answer is just a question's way of asking another question. A hypothesis might well be verified, but verification is important only to the extent to which it is the key to another door. 

The answer way makes a concession to the fundamentalist. It says, "I am ready to believe, but only when I see it." Like the fundamentalist, the answerer wants certainty; he is just willing to test his faith a little more. Trust but verify. The question way makes no such concession. There's always grass to be gathered and a fire to be lit.